The Kings and Queens of Hans Christian Andersen


CURRICULUM, THEMES AND SPECIAL TOPICS


HOME LANGUAGES AND SPEECH

CONTESTSFOREIGN LANGUAGE

 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

SCHOOL CLIMATE AND POSITIVE PLAYGROUND

HEALTHY LIVING

VISITS FROM EDUCATION REVIEW OFFICE AND MINISTER OF EDUCATION


SPONSORED MATH-A-THON FUNDRAISER

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT IN EXTERNAL COMPETITION

GRANT APPLICATIONS AND FUNDRAISING

BOOKS IN HOMES

PROPERTYRELATIONSHIPS WITH COMMUNITYFUTURE

AIMS FOR SUTTON PARK SCHOOL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home
Contact Us
Enrolment
Staff
School Events
Bilingual Classes
Intermediate Options
School Notices

Activity - Pania

Search TKI
School Site
Intranet
Jumpoff Day
Auckland Rugby
Kelly Tarltons
Principals Report
Penguins
Fabulous Fibres

The following contain the Principal's Report for 2005.
The full report, including report on student achievement, is available for viewing at the school office.

REPORT FROM THE PRINCIPAL


CURRICULUM, THEMES AND SPECIAL TOPICS


Term 1: Our main topic was animal care and conservation. All classes enjoyed a trip to the zoo and we had a speaker and video about how to keep safe around dogs. We also studied maps, charts and graphs using tasks from the National Education Monitoring project. We learnt New Wave folk dance from a team from Le Bourree.
Term 2: We started with a unit on forestry. Gareth Jones from Woodhill Forest demonstrated aspects of forestry and use of equipment. Senior students heard a talk about careers in forestry. Juniors also went to the Botanical Gardens to 'focus on trees'.
Next we investigated the qualities that make a hero and an explorer through studying some of the great characters from history. The term concluded with a focus on “The Body System”. This included a visit to the Body Odyssey at the Telstra Events Centre. The Life Education caravan was also here for two weeks to demonstrate further the workings of the lungs, heart, digestive systwem and other body functions.

 

Term 3: This term started with Pacific Myths and Legends. Many classes prepared writing and artwork for the Manukau Libraries Pacific Island week. Our students gained many awards in this competition. We moved into a study of famous mathematicians during New Zealand maths week. Many senior students were successful at online maths competitions.
The topic of “The Chicken and the Egg” covered chicken farming and egg production, and raised ethical questions about the farming of battery hens. After this a food technology unit explored ways of cooking with eggs. Year 3-7 students received a talk about safety around electricity from Vector Electricity.
Term 4: A unit on weather saw wind vanes and other weather machines constructed in the playground. The 200th anniversary of the birth of Hans Christian Andersen saw us apply for and receive a number of HCA books from the Danish Society of New Zealand. These were used as a focus for reading and for studying the life and writings of HCA. This culminated with all classes producing very successful dramas based around Hans Christian Andersen and his works.
The Theatre Group gave an interactive drama on Biosecurity Fall Webworm . The term finished with a focus on outdoor education and safety in the outdoors. Year 7 and 8 students enjoyed a camp at Camp Adair.


HOME LANGUAGES AND SPEECH CONTESTS

Our weekly Maori language broadcast continued, with the vocabulary used linked to the current study topics. Years 5-8 students also all had one term of Maori language lessons.
As always, speech contests in English and the home languages were an important feature of the third term. Our school contests were well supported and we had many successes in inter-school contests in all our main languages:
English, Y5-6: 3rd Mathew Patua “My Hero Tana
Umanga”
Maori, Y5-6: 1st Sharlotte-Paige Boaza
Maori, Y7-8: 3rd Teri Moana Pivott
Cook Island, Y5-6: 2nd Magdalene Kareroa
Niuean, Y5-6: 3rd Cassandra Molesi
Niuean, Y7-8: 1st Jacinda Sipene, 2nd Penehata Filise
Samoan, Y5-6: 3rd Ruby Silva
Samoan, Y7-8: 3rd, Christina Silva
Tongan, Y5-6: 1st= Viliami Uhi, Seini Siofele
Tongan, Y7-8: 1st Tulisa Fifita, Moala Tuitupou

FOREIGN LANGUAGE


Senior students all took courses in French, Chinese and Spanish for one term. A lively French club was held at lunch times in which French folkdance was a popular activity. Top French students went on a visit to a French antique shop and also enjoyed French pastries.
We were fortunate to receive substantial funding from the Chinese Language Foundation towards our Chinese language programme. The cheque was presented by the president Mr John Graham at an assembly in front of many distinguished visitors from the Foundation and the Ministry of Education. Students from Sutton Park performed Chinese drums and dances and demonstrated a conversation in Chinese. It was altogether a most impressive performance.
Later in the year, we held a Chinese cultural day. Members of the Chinese Language Foundation came a presented a number of demonstrations and workshops such as martial arts, Chinese painting, calligraphy, singing sticks, diabolo (Chinese yoyo), paper cutting and folding, and Chinese children's games. Caterers also produced traditional Chinese food for sale.


SCHOOL CLIMATE AND POSITIVE PLAYGROUND
All students are taught to “Stop - what you are doing; Think - of the consequences; Do - the right thing and make the best choice, before following of any course of action. We also emphasise use your W.I.T.S. If you are being teased, Walk away; Ignore; Talk to someone; Stand up for yourself in a cool way (not aggro or weak).
In Terms 2 and 3 we revised the “Positive Playground” programme in which student could gain positive tokens for kind and thoughtful playground behaviours. Such tokens went into a weekly draw for small gifts, such as posters, magazines, notebooks. Students' names along with examples of their behaviours were also listed in newsletters to parents.

 


HEALTHY LIVING
In 2005, the Board agreed that fizzy and/or sugary drinks should not be brought to school. We noticed an immediate reduction in the number and size of large bottles and fizzy drinks being brought to school. Sweets, lollies and bubble gums are also not allowed.

VISITS FROM EDUCATION REVIEW OFFICE AND MINISTER OF EDUCATION
We welcomed four members of the Review Office in August. A summary of their positive review findings is elsewhere in this report.
In November we received a visit from the Minister of Education, the Honourable Steve Maharey. We think he had heard about our good ERO report! He visited a class to see “finger phonics”, commented favourable on the appearance of the school, and discussed reading and literacy issues with the Principal.


SPONSORED MATH-A-THON FUNDRAISER
We had a magnificent response to this quizathon which is held once every two years. Bronze, silver and gold certificates were given out to top fundraisers. Over $20,000 was raised
altogether. Year 7-8 students were able to use their funds raised for their camp, top classes received McDonalds' lunches, and all students received a free trip.


STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT IN EXTERNAL COMPETITION
University of New South Wales Competitions
Mathematics: Credit (top 30% in New Zealand) Y5 Mecham Smalley; Y7 Andy Ho; Y8 Finau Feiloakitau, Priscilla Kalapu
Writing: Credit Y4 Joshua Edwards, Stephen Patana, Kupuola Paea, Susan Paaka, Florida Prescott, Maata Tangataevaha; Y5 Susan Ho, Veomai Malapa, Gabrielle Puna; Y6 Magdalene Kareroa; Y7 Rawinia Fagamalo; Y8 Sosiana Tupou
English: Y6 Magdalene Kareroa; Y7 Rawinia Fagamalo
University of Otago Problem Challenge
Excellence (top 11% in NZ) Charlotte Davis (Y7)Merit: Josephine Siofele, Andy Ho (Y7); Josephine Tafa, Patricia Tava, Moala Tuitupou, Sosiana Tupou, Alapasita Finau, Ani Tangitu, Saane Vainikolo, Finau Feiloakitau, Priscilla Kalapu (Y8)

THE ARTS
The Performance Week in December featuring the works of Hans Christian Andersen was well attended by parents supporting their child's class. The productions were enhanced by the new stage and lighting, with teachers and students becoming increasingly more skilled in stage production. One performance from each syndicate was repeated one week later to give more opportunity for everyone to see.

 

Thirty of our senior students with talent in drama attended a performance of Joseph and the Amazing Techni-coloured Dreamcoat at the Aotea centre.
The senior choir performed in the World Vision concert at St Columba Church, Botany Downs in December.


SPORTS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Students took part in a large range of sports both within school and in outside competition. An exciting opportunity for Y8 students was the Waterwise programme that included water safety, kayaking and sailing. The Astroturf surface was completed towards the end of the year. This will be a great asset, enabling play to continue in wetter weather and providing an enclosed surface for sports such as hockey and tennis.


BOOKS IN HOMES
We thank the Rotary Club of Newmarket for their support of the Duffy books programme, in which all students were able to choose five books during the year. Students enjoyed Duffy's High Sea Adventure, and role model assemblies.


SELF-REVIEW AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT
The main thrust of our self-review was on factors that influence teaching and learning. We believe that student achievement is strongly influenced by what happens in the classroom. Teacher development and school practices concentrated on helping teachers to set expectations for achievement and to analyse their students' achievement in relation to these.
Over the past year, staff development has focussed on formative assessment as a means of helping children to be clear about what they are to learn, to know when they are making progress, and to get guidance about what is the next step. Peer teacher observation has enabled teachers to coach each other on teaching in this way, and in giving formative feedback to students. Planning and evaluation formats have been adapted to meet these criteria, and planning is becoming more clearly focussed on the learning intentions.
Staff development in literacy has examined the features of text types. A year literacy overview gives guidance on the appropriate genres and text types to link with our curriculum study topics, to be used as exemplars for both reading and writing.

GRANT APPLICATIONS AND FUNDRAISING
This was possible one of our best years ever for successful grant applications. The largest (received December 04) was $85,456 from the ASB for hall and library books. $8496 was received from Skycity for stage curtains and lighting. Other grants received were for Young Leaders' Day (Southern Trust); sports nets, goals, uniforms, court markings and other sports equipment (Lion Foundation; Century Trust; New Zealand Community Trust; Mangere Bridge Sport & Cultural Society Incorporated; Pub Charity Trust;); and the Waterwise programme (Papatoetoe West-Mangere East Education Trust).


PROPERTY
The main projects were extensions to hall and stage, under hall PE store, and stage lighting. The Astroturf was completed by the end of the year and is undoubtedly a major asset to the school. Not only will it provide an all weather surface for winter playtimes, but will also provide training opportunities for sports that are increasingly being played on this type of surface, such as hockey. This resource was funded from accumulated funds built up over a number of previous years, reflecting a careful approach to expenditure, yet at the same time the curriculum is well resourced.


RELATIONSHIPS WITH COMMUNITY
Parents and community are supportive of school events especially those in which their children are participating. Parent-teacher interviews this year saw our best ever turn out of parents, even though the weather was not that good. The average participation was about 75% of parents, whilst some classes saw almost 100% turn-out. Interestingly, senior classes had as great a participation rate as did the junior classes. Speech and drama performances were also well supported.


FUTURE AIMS FOR SUTTON PARK SCHOOL
The school has a strong history of analysing student achievement. Over the years, there has been a move from assessing student achievement largely against school agreed targets to an
increasing emphasis on measurement against national benchmarks. This has become more feasible now a greater range of tests and exemplars are available. Our goal both short and long term is for our student achievement to more closely match national norms.
Our annually updated Charter sets out targets for achievement that will be reported on in that year. Student achievement is reported on in the Annual Report and Financial Statement.